JAMIE RYDER

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JAMIE RYDER
       Anonymous

Ha, I was just looking at their previews five minutes ago

I only own one sweater from them (one of the 100% cotton ones), but it was pretty good before it got ruined in the rain. Very nice to wear against bare skin. 

Seeing the Giger decks made me sad :(

       Anonymous

humalien:

Why don’t any of you ever, uh, “expand” on why Demobaza (which, once again, is a brand which started out as a Korean fakes manufacturer — and continues to this day in very nearly the same vein) is such an intoxicating presence. What about it is so appealing to you? I ask you seriously because I do not understand. I have never understood. To me, every garment Demobaza has ever put out makes explicitly obvious just to what a degree the Demobaza design team thinks you, the customer, are a blithering idiot. If I had any other choice in the world, why would I put something on my body that treats me like a wallet attached to a flesh sac incapable of being a discriminating consumer or, in fact, thinking critically about anything at all. This is, very literally, what this entire blog is about.

Here’s an incomplete list of brands whose success relies on you shutting your eyes as tight as you can and screaming, “I can’t hear you!!!” at the top of your lungs:

- All Saints/Spitalfields — without a doubt the most reprehensible, despicable institution in the industry!

- Any sort of OAK NYC, ADYN, BLK DNM, Enfin Leve, Knomadik, Skingraft, Odeur-type operation.

- Outright fakes manufacturers Fabrixquare, Demobaza, etc.

- M.a+, Amadei’s asst. projects, also Augusta/A1923/Adiciannoveventitre.

- Boris Bidjan Saberi … 

This is not a matter of my opinion. These are brands whose business models from the outset have been ”We Will Find the Customers Who Don’t Know Any Better, and In Fact Refuse to Learn.” This is the foundation of their business practices — for example, what stores they sell to — and it’s also, very literally, the foundation of the design work they do every single season. They profit by stealing the designs of and then undercutting more talented, typically independent and less visible artists — Altieri, Poell, Mariavittoria Sargentini — and trusting in the fact that you are and will continue to be a passive consumer. That you won’t take time to investigate or examine that pair of pants. That you will settle for the first pair you find on Amazon that look sort of like it and also ship to your door.

I am not commanding you from the mountaintop not to buy from these brands. It’s not my money. But please, please do not have any illusions about the fact that you are supporting the usurpage of independent artists. That you are supporting the continued existence of an industry that is functionally impossible to break into without, say, the backing of a luxury holding group.

Don’t you have a friend with a brand they’re trying to get off the ground. Don’t you follow someone doing really incredible independent work. Don’t you struggle to figure out why your favorite small-order designer just suddenly closed up shop two years ago and you can’t find any of their pieces any more. Do you imagine that this is all just one big series of coincidences.

If you really want to wear something from Zara or All Saints, why not consider buying it secondhand. I can’t do that. The synthetics give me a rash. That’s all for now.

       Anonymous

Of course

       Anonymous

No, the ones from Vicious are poplin with 5% elastane, iirc (it might be a little less)